Posts about Docker

In this post Derek Chamorro, Senior Security Architect at Atlassian, shares some common mistakes made when building Dockerfiles.

Hear Hear, the new Git 2.8.0 release is out! In the past couple of weeks, while the release candidate cycle was ongoing, I went through the commits and release notes trying the new things and scribbling down the interesting bits. To save you time here is a subjective selection of things to try out. Enjoy!

The Swarm is here. It is here to help us developers focus more about the relations between the components of our architecture and less about the physical machines and their IP addresses. If you need a refresher I spoke about and wrote an introduction to orchestration and the Docker tools: have a listen or read and come back because we are bringing this knowledge to the next level today.

In case you missed it, last year we launched our Bitbucket Docker Hub integration as part of the Docker Hub 2.0 launch. We are now pleased to announce the next version of this add-on is now available. If you already have it installed you'll get it automatically. If you haven't already installed it see below for instructions on adding it to your account. Carry on reading for more information on this release.

After the fantastic DockerCon Europe and the recent releases of Docker 1.9.1, Compose 0.5.2 and Swarm 1.0.1 I finally have all the missing bits to automatically deploy a suite of Atlassian products to a swarm cluster without supervision:

In case you missed it, last month we launched our Bitbucket Docker Hub integration as part of the Docker Hub 2.0 launch. We are now pleased to announce the next version of this add-on is now available. If you already have it installed you'll get it automatically. If you haven't already installed it see below for instructions on adding it to your account. Carry on reading for more information on this release.

As part of the Docker Hub 2.0 launch we're pleased to announce integration of Docker Hub into Atlassian Bitbucket. This brings your Docker workflow together with Bitbucket to save you time and allow you to see source code stats along side your Docker repo in one place.

Sometimes I need to be hit in the head with an axe to find a solution to a problem that has been bugging me forever. A minimal Java container has been on my wish list since I found out about Docker and I've been writing about running Java in Docker for sometime already.

Recently I've been writing a service in Go to enhance the projects dashboard on Bitbucket - if you haven't heard we launched Atlassian Connect for Bitbucket as a way for anyone to build add-ons for three millions of Bitbucket users out there. Like many other Gophers I've been happily deploying my Go services using Docker. The process is smooth and pleasurable if not for one thing: the size of the official default Go image.

Bamboo provides the powerful ability to dynamically scale your build farm by launching swarms of build agents on Amazon's infrastructure. These AWS images are fully customisable, but the process is a bit involved. This post introduces a simpler method of doing this using Packer and Ansible. Read on for the details (and a ready-to-use example repository) ...

In this video you'll see me use the pre-release version of Docker Machine (0.3.0) to deploy a 3 node swarm on Digital Ocean and use label constraints to deploy our Java based enterprise Git server Stash and PostgreSQL.

Today I have an overview of the new developments in the Docker ecosystem. I'll explain briefly what Docker is and how it is evolving from a tool to package applications and easily distribute them to a set of tools to orchestrate and manage loosely or tightly coupled cloud solutions.

One of the features of systemd is its ability to defer the start-up of networked applications until their services are actually requested, a process referred to as socket activation. This isn't really a new an idea; systemd borrowed the idea from launchd which has been in OS X since Tiger's release in 2005, and the venerable Unix inetd has implemented a simpler version of it since the 1980s. Socket activation has a number of advantages over scripted or event-based start-up systems; in particular it decouples the application start-up order from the service description, and can even resolve circular application dependencies. Docker containers (and other types such as systemd's nspawn or LXC) are almost exclusively network processes, so it would be useful to extend socket activation to them.

Even if it's still in early stages of development, Docker Machine is a very powerful tool, one of the three very intriguing new pieces of the Docker ecosystem - the other ones being compose and swarm. What does Docker machine do? It allows you to create and manage Docker hosts on local machines or cloud providers.

Today, I want to tell you about the results of a hackathon, or as we call it a ShipIt project. It's fun for me to share and I hope you'll find it interesting. At Atlassian we have a big culture of innovation and experimentation. Every quarter, the company stops for 24 hours and employees can pick their own project to scratch their own itch: they form groups, sprint and spike working on new ideas. Sometimes we work on things completely off the wall, sometimes tiny improvements. Several key features included in our products (or even entirely new products) came out of these sprints of innovations.