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Source

Browse the source code in the repository and create new commits by uploading.

List commits that modified a file

GET /2.0/repositories/{workspace}/{repo_slug}/filehistory/{commit}/{path}

Returns a paginated list of commits that modified the specified file.

Commits are returned in reverse chronological order. This is roughly equivalent to the following commands:

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$ git log --follow --date-order <sha> <path>

By default, Bitbucket will follow renames and the path name in the returned entries reflects that. This can be turned off using the ?renames=false query parameter.

Results are returned in descending chronological order by default, and like most endpoints you can filter and sort the response to only provide exactly the data you want.

For example, if you wanted to find commits made before 2011-05-18 against a file named README.rst, but you only wanted the path and date, your query would look like this:

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$ curl 'https://api.bitbucket.org/2.0/repositories/evzijst/dogslow/filehistory/master/README.rst'\
  '?fields=values.next,values.path,values.commit.date&q=commit.date<=2011-05-18'
{
  "values": [
    {
      "commit": {
        "date": "2011-05-17T07:32:09+00:00"
      },
      "path": "README.rst"
    },
    {
      "commit": {
        "date": "2011-05-16T06:33:28+00:00"
      },
      "path": "README.txt"
    },
    {
      "commit": {
        "date": "2011-05-16T06:15:39+00:00"
      },
      "path": "README.txt"
    }
  ]
}

In the response you can see that the file was renamed to README.rst by the commit made on 2011-05-16, and was previously named README.txt.

repository

Request

Path parameters
commit Required

string

The commit's SHA1.

path Required

string

Path to the file.

repo_slug Required

string

This can either be the repository slug or the UUID of the repository, surrounded by curly-braces, for example: {repository UUID}.

workspace Required

string

This can either be the workspace ID (slug) or the workspace UUID surrounded by curly-braces, for example: {workspace UUID}.

Query parameters
renames

string

When true, Bitbucket will follow the history of the file across renames (this is the default behavior). This can be turned off by specifying false.

q

string

Query string to narrow down the response as per filtering and sorting.

sort

string

Name of a response property sort the result by as per filtering and sorting.

Example

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curl --request GET \
  --url 'https://api.bitbucket.org/2.0/repositories/{workspace}/{repo_slug}/filehistory/{commit}/{path}' \
  --header 'Authorization: Bearer <access_token>' \
  --header 'Accept: application/json'

Responses

A paginated list of commits that modified the specified file

Content typeValue
application/json

Paginated Files

Get the root directory of the main branch

GET /2.0/repositories/{workspace}/{repo_slug}/src

This endpoint redirects the client to the directory listing of the root directory on the main branch.

This is equivalent to directly hitting /2.0/repositories/{username}/{repo_slug}/src/{commit}/{path} without having to know the name or SHA1 of the repo's main branch.

To create new commits, POST to this endpoint

repository

Request

Path parameters
repo_slug Required

string

This can either be the repository slug or the UUID of the repository, surrounded by curly-braces, for example: {repository UUID}.

workspace Required

string

This can either be the workspace ID (slug) or the workspace UUID surrounded by curly-braces, for example: {workspace UUID}.

Query parameters
format

string

Instead of returning the file's contents, return the (json) meta data for it.

Valid values: meta

Example

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curl --request GET \
  --url 'https://api.bitbucket.org/2.0/repositories/{workspace}/{repo_slug}/src' \
  --header 'Authorization: Bearer <access_token>' \
  --header 'Accept: application/json'

Responses

If the path matches a file, then the raw contents of the file are returned (unless the format=meta query parameter was provided, in which case a json document containing the file's meta data is returned). If the path matches a directory, then a paginated list of file and directory entries is returned (if the format=meta query parameter was provided, then the json document containing the directory's meta data is returned).

Content typeValue
application/json

Paginated Tree Entry

Create a commit by uploading a file

POST /2.0/repositories/{workspace}/{repo_slug}/src

This endpoint is used to create new commits in the repository by uploading files.

To add a new file to a repository:

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$ curl https://api.bitbucket.org/2.0/repositories/username/slug/src \
  -F /repo/path/to/image.png=@image.png

This will create a new commit on top of the main branch, inheriting the contents of the main branch, but adding (or overwriting) the image.png file to the repository in the /repo/path/to directory.

To create a commit that deletes files, use the files parameter:

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$ curl https://api.bitbucket.org/2.0/repositories/username/slug/src \
  -F files=/file/to/delete/1.txt \
  -F files=/file/to/delete/2.txt

You can add/modify/delete multiple files in a request. Rename/move a file by deleting the old path and adding the content at the new path.

This endpoint accepts multipart/form-data (as in the examples above), as well as application/x-www-form-urlencoded.

multipart/form-data

A multipart/form-data post contains a series of "form fields" that identify both the individual files that are being uploaded, as well as additional, optional meta data.

Files are uploaded in file form fields (those that have a Content-Disposition parameter) whose field names point to the remote path in the repository where the file should be stored. Path field names are always interpreted to be absolute from the root of the repository, regardless whether the client uses a leading slash (as the above curl example did).

File contents are treated as bytes and are not decoded as text.

The commit message, as well as other non-file meta data for the request, is sent along as normal form field elements. Meta data fields share the same namespace as the file objects. For multipart/form-data bodies that should not lead to any ambiguity, as the Content-Disposition header will contain the filename parameter to distinguish between a file named "message" and the commit message field.

application/x-www-form-urlencoded

It is also possible to upload new files using a simple application/x-www-form-urlencoded POST. This can be convenient when uploading pure text files:

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$ curl https://api.bitbucket.org/2.0/repositories/atlassian/bbql/src \
  --data-urlencode "/path/to/me.txt=Lorem ipsum." \
  --data-urlencode "message=Initial commit" \
  --data-urlencode "author=Erik van Zijst <erik.van.zijst@gmail.com>"

There could be a field name clash if a client were to upload a file named "message", as this filename clashes with the meta data property for the commit message. To avoid this and to upload files whose names clash with the meta data properties, use a leading slash for the files, e.g. curl --data-urlencode "/message=file contents".

When an explicit slash is omitted for a file whose path matches that of a meta data parameter, then it is interpreted as meta data, not as a file.

While this API aims to facilitate the most common use cases, it is possible to perform some more advanced operations like creating a new symlink in the repository, or creating an executable file.

Files can be supplied with a x-attributes value in the Content-Disposition header. For example, to upload an executable file, as well as create a symlink from README.txt to README:

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--===============1438169132528273974==
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-ID: "bin/shutdown.sh"
Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="shutdown.sh"; x-attributes:"executable"

#!/bin/sh
halt

--===============1438169132528273974==
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-ID: "/README.txt"
Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="README.txt"; x-attributes:"link"

README
--===============1438169132528273974==--

Links are files that contain the target path and have x-attributes:"link" set.

When overwriting links with files, or vice versa, the newly uploaded file determines both the new contents, as well as the attributes. That means uploading a file without specifying x-attributes="link" will create a regular file, even if the parent commit hosted a symlink at the same path.

The same applies to executables. When modifying an existing executable file, the form-data file element must include x-attributes="executable" in order to preserve the executable status of the file.

Note that this API does not support the creation or manipulation of subrepos / submodules.

repository:write

Request

Path parameters
repo_slug Required

string

This can either be the repository slug or the UUID of the repository, surrounded by curly-braces, for example: {repository UUID}.

workspace Required

string

This can either be the workspace ID (slug) or the workspace UUID surrounded by curly-braces, for example: {workspace UUID}.

Query parameters
message

string

The commit message. When omitted, Bitbucket uses a canned string.

author

string

The raw string to be used as the new commit's author. This string follows the format Erik van Zijst <evzijst@atlassian.com>.

When omitted, Bitbucket uses the authenticated user's full/display name and primary email address. Commits cannot be created anonymously.

parents

string

A comma-separated list of SHA1s of the commits that should be the parents of the newly created commit.

When omitted, the new commit will inherit from and become a child of the main branch's tip/HEAD commit.

When more than one SHA1 is provided, the first SHA1 identifies the commit from which the content will be inherited.".

files

string

Optional field that declares the files that the request is manipulating. When adding a new file to a repo, or when overwriting an existing file, the client can just upload the full contents of the file in a normal form field and the use of this files meta data field is redundant. However, when the files field contains a file path that does not have a corresponding, identically-named form field, then Bitbucket interprets that as the client wanting to replace the named file with the null set and the file is deleted instead.

Paths in the repo that are referenced in neither files nor an individual file field, remain unchanged and carry over from the parent to the new commit.

This API does not support renaming as an explicit feature. To rename a file, simply delete it and recreate it under the new name in the same commit.

branch

string

The name of the branch that the new commit should be created on. When omitted, the commit will be created on top of the main branch and will become the main branch's new head.

When a branch name is provided that already exists in the repo, then the commit will be created on top of that branch. In this case, if a parent SHA1 was also provided, then it is asserted that the parent is the branch's tip/HEAD at the time the request is made. When this is not the case, a 409 is returned.

When a new branch name is specified (that does not already exist in the repo), and no parent SHA1s are provided, then the new commit will inherit from the current main branch's tip/HEAD commit, but not advance the main branch. The new commit will be the new branch. When the request also specifies a parent SHA1, then the new commit and branch are created directly on top of the parent commit, regardless of the state of the main branch.

When a branch name is not specified, but a parent SHA1 is provided, then Bitbucket asserts that it represents the main branch's current HEAD/tip, or a 409 is returned.

When a branch name is not specified and the repo is empty, the new commit will become the repo's root commit and will be on the main branch.

When a branch name is specified and the repo is empty, the new commit will become the repo's root commit and also define the repo's main branch going forward.

This API cannot be used to create additional root commits in non-empty repos.

The branch field cannot be repeated.

As a side effect, this API can be used to create a new branch without modifying any files, by specifying a new branch name in this field, together with parents, but omitting the files fields, while not sending any files. This will create a new commit and branch with the same contents as the first parent. The diff of this commit against its first parent will be empty.

Example

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curl --request POST \
  --url 'https://api.bitbucket.org/2.0/repositories/{workspace}/{repo_slug}/src' \
  --header 'Authorization: Bearer <access_token>'

Responses

A schema has not been defined for this response code.

Get file or directory contents

GET /2.0/repositories/{workspace}/{repo_slug}/src/{commit}/{path}

This endpoints is used to retrieve the contents of a single file, or the contents of a directory at a specified revision.

Raw file contents

When path points to a file, this endpoint returns the raw contents. The response's Content-Type is derived from the filename extension (not from the contents). The file contents are not processed and no character encoding/recoding is performed and as a result no character encoding is included as part of the Content-Type.

The Content-Disposition header will be "attachment" to prevent browsers from running executable files.

If the file is managed by LFS, then a 301 redirect pointing to Atlassian's media services platform is returned.

The response includes an ETag that is based on the contents of the file and its attributes. This means that an empty __init__.py always returns the same ETag, regardless on the directory it lives in, or the commit it is on.

File meta data

When the request for a file path includes the query parameter ?format=meta, instead of returning the file's raw contents, Bitbucket instead returns the JSON object describing the file's properties:

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$ curl https://api.bitbucket.org/2.0/repositories/atlassian/bbql/src/eefd5ef/tests/__init__.py?format=meta
{
  "links": {
    "self": {
      "href": "https://api.bitbucket.org/2.0/repositories/atlassian/bbql/src/eefd5ef5d3df01aed629f650959d6706d54cd335/tests/__init__.py"
    },
    "meta": {
      "href": "https://api.bitbucket.org/2.0/repositories/atlassian/bbql/src/eefd5ef5d3df01aed629f650959d6706d54cd335/tests/__init__.py?format=meta"
    }
  },
  "path": "tests/__init__.py",
  "commit": {
    "type": "commit",
    "hash": "eefd5ef5d3df01aed629f650959d6706d54cd335",
    "links": {
      "self": {
        "href": "https://api.bitbucket.org/2.0/repositories/atlassian/bbql/commit/eefd5ef5d3df01aed629f650959d6706d54cd335"
      },
      "html": {
        "href": "https://bitbucket.org/atlassian/bbql/commits/eefd5ef5d3df01aed629f650959d6706d54cd335"
      }
    }
  },
  "attributes": [],
  "type": "commit_file",
  "size": 0
}

File objects contain an attributes element that contains a list of possible modifiers. Currently defined values are:

  • link -- indicates that the entry is a symbolic link. The contents of the file represent the path the link points to.
  • executable -- indicates that the file has the executable bit set.