Create a GUI with templates and AUI

You've added SAL modules and built the foundation for an interactive plugin by creating a servlet component. Now, you'll add a GUI for your users to input data. You can use resources Atlassian provides in the Atlassian User Interface (AUI). This section of the tutorial will walk you through creating and managing Velocity templates, adding CSS, and viewing your plugin in its GUI form. This section includes the following instructions: 

Introduction to AUI (Atlassian User Interface)

AUI is a library of resources you can use to make your plugin visually integrated with Atlassian products. The AUI library includes CSS, JavaScript, and other templates. Using resources from this library ensures your plugin interface is compliant with Atlassian Design Guidelines (ADG). 

In earlier steps, you added a component module called TemplateRenderer. Here, you'll update your source code to import TemplateRenderer. You'll configure TemplateRenderer to use a Velocity template to format your user interface. Then, you'll  add AUI elements and templates for TemplateRenderer to display for an Atlassian look and feel.

Step 1. Update dependencies in the pom.xml

Here, you'll update the dependencies to reflect the TemplateRenderer module you added earlier. 

  1. Open your pom.xml.
  2. Locate the <dependency> section.
  3. Find the com.atlassian.sal group.
  4. Add the templateRenderer in a dependency group above the com.atlassian.sal group.

           <dependency>
    	  		<groupId>com.atlassian.templaterenderer</groupId>
    	  		<artifactId>atlassian-template-renderer-api</artifactId>
    	  		<scope>provided</scope>
    		</dependency>
  5. Save and close the file.

Step 2. Create a Velocity template

Atlassian applications use both .soy (Soy) and .vm (Velocity) templates for rendering user interfaces. In this example, you'll create a Velocity template to support your GUI.

  1. Navigate to src/main/resources within the base directory adminUI.

  2. Create an admin.vm Velocity template, and fill in the contents with:

    <html>
      <head>
        <title>My Admin</title>
      </head>
      <body>
        <form id="admin">
          <div>
            <label for="name">Name</label>
            <input type="text" id="name" name="name">
          </div>
          <div>
            <label for="age">Age</label>
            <input type="text" id="age" name="age">
          </div>
          <div>
            <input type="submit" value="Save">
          </div>
        </form>
      </body>
    </html>

Step 3. Update MyPluginServlet 

Up until this point, your servlet has been displaying HTML from your MyPluginServlet class. Now you'll update the class to render content using the TemplateRenderer component import you added earlier. TemplateRenderer will display the admin.vm template you just created. 

  1. Update MyPluginServlet.java to import TemplateRenderer and use your new admin.vm template.

    MyPluginServlet should look as follows: 

    package com.atlassian.plugins.tutorial.refapp;
    
    import javax.servlet.*;
    import javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet;
    import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest;
    import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletResponse;
    import java.io.IOException;
    
    import com.atlassian.plugin.spring.scanner.annotation.imports.ComponentImport;
    import com.atlassian.plugin.spring.scanner.annotation.component.Scanned;
    import javax.inject.Inject;
    
    import java.net.URI;
    import com.atlassian.sal.api.auth.LoginUriProvider;
    import com.atlassian.sal.api.user.UserManager;
    import com.atlassian.templaterenderer.TemplateRenderer;
     
    @Scanned
    public class MyPluginServlet extends HttpServlet
    {
        @ComponentImport
        private final UserManager userManager;
        @ComponentImport
        private final LoginUriProvider loginUriProvider;
        @ComponentImport
        private final TemplateRenderer templateRenderer;
    
        @Inject
        public MyPluginServlet(UserManager userManager, LoginUriProvider loginUriProvider, TemplateRenderer templateRenderer)
        {
            this.userManager = userManager;
            this.loginUriProvider = loginUriProvider;
            this.templateRenderer = templateRenderer;
        }
    
        @Override
        public void doGet(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) throws ServletException, IOException
        {
            String username = userManager.getRemoteUsername(request);
            if (username == null || !userManager.isSystemAdmin(username))
            {
                redirectToLogin(request, response);
                return;
            }
            templateRenderer.render("admin.vm", response.getWriter());
        }
        private void redirectToLogin(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) throws IOException
        {
            response.sendRedirect(loginUriProvider.getLoginUri(getUri(request)).toASCIIString());
        }
        private URI getUri(HttpServletRequest request)
        {
            StringBuffer builder = request.getRequestURL();
            if (request.getQueryString() != null)
            {
                builder.append("?");
                builder.append(request.getQueryString());
            }
            return URI.create(builder.toString());
        }
        // This is what your MyPluginServlet.java class should look like after creating your admin.vm template
    }
  2. Save the changes and close the file.
  3. Use atlas-mvn package to reload your plugin.
  4. Return to http://localhost:2990/jira/plugins/servlet/test.
  5. Your servlet reloads, now with fields from your admin.vm: 

Step 4. Add a decorator and CSS

You have a GUI, but it's not much to look at. Now you can add some visual appeal to your plugin using Atlassian User Interface (AUI) resources and some CSS.

  1. Open your admin.vm Velocity template.

  2. Add a <meta> element directly after the title. 

    Insert <meta name="decorator" content="atl.admin">. This tag should be inside the <head> section.

    <html>
      <head>
        <title>My Admin</title>
        <meta name="decorator" content="atl.admin">
      </head>
      <body>
        <form id="admin">
          <div>
            <label for="name">Name</label>
            <input type="text" id="name" name="name">
          </div>
          <div>
            <label for="age">Age</label>
            <input type="text" id="age" name="age">
          </div>
          <div>
            <input type="submit" value="Save">
          </div>
        </form>
      </body>
    </html>
  3. Save the file. 
    Leave the file open for future changes.
  4. Use QuickReload to update your changes.
    The page loads and now uses an AUI decorator. 
  5. Return to your admin.vm file. 
  6. Add some CSS. 

    Replace your admin.vm contents with the following:

    <html>
      <head>
        <title>MyServlet Admin</title>
        <meta name="decorator" content="atl.admin">
      </head>
      <body>
        <form id="admin" class="aui">
            <div class="field-group">
                 <label for="name">Name:</label>
                 <input type="text" id="name" name="name" class="text">
            </div>
            <div class="field-group">
                 <label for="age">Age:</label>
                 <input type="text" id="age" name="age" class="text">
            </div>
            <div class="field-group">
                <input type="submit" value="Save" class="button">
            </div>
        </form>
      </body>
    </html>
  7. Reload the plugin and return once again to your servlet at http://localhost:2990/jira/plugins/servlet/test.

Next steps

Your add-on looks great! Now you'll add a POST method so it can store and retrieve user data.

 

 

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